First Semester Credits
ENL101 M 3
MAT240   4
CSC110 (or)
CSC120 (or)
CSC105
M
Computer Programming I: JAVA (or)
Computer Programming I: C++ (or)
Computer Programming I: Python

CSC110 Computer Programming I: JAVA

In this introduction to the field of computer science, students use projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test programs in Java. Programming style, expression, and documentation are emphasized. Object-oriented programming methodology, graphical user interfaces, debugging techniques, string processing, and arrays are covered. Java provides an introduction to programming for students in any academic discipline.

Prerequisite: MAT035 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring


CSC120 Computer Programming I: C++

Students use projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test programs in C++. Programming style, expression, and documentation are emphasized. Object-oriented programming methodology, graphical user interfaces, debugging techniques, pointers, simple recursion, and string processing are covered.

Prerequisite: MAT035 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and working knowledge of any programming language

Offered: Fall


CSC105 Computer Programming I: Python

In this introduction to the field of computer science, students use projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test programs in Python. Programming style, expression, and documentation are emphasized. Object-oriented programming methodology, graphical user interfaces, debugging techniques, string processing, and basic searching and sorting algorithms are covered. Python provides an introduction to programming for students in any academic discipline.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3 (or)
4 (or)
3
   
Physics

Note: PHY151 Physics I and PHY152 Physics II (or) PHY211 University Physics I and PHY212 University Physics II.


PHY151 Physics I

First semester of a two-semester introduction to college physics without calculus. This course covers mechanics (kinematics, dynamics and statics), relativity and some heat. The course is appropriate for any student interested in science and particularly appropriate for health sciences and pre-professional students. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT040 or MAT110 or MAT035, and ENL108 or ESL201 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.


PHY211 University Physics I

First semester of a two-semester introduction to university physics. This course covers mechanics (kinematics, dynamics and statics), relativity and some heat. The course is appropriate for math, science, and engineering students. Calculus will be used. Previous experience in physics (such as PHY106) is strongly recommended. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in MAT240, Calculus I. (3 lecture hours/2 laboratory hours/1 recitation hour)

Prerequisite: MAT195; Co-requisite: ENL101 and MAT240

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
    Behavioral & Social Science 3
Second Semester Credits
ENL102   3
MAT250   4
CSC130   4
   
Physics

Note: PHY151 Physics I and PHY152 Physics II (or) PHY211 University Physics I and PHY212 University Physics II.


PHY152 Physics II

Second semester of a two-semester introduction to college physics without calculus. This course covers vibrations and waves; electricity and magnetism; light and optics, and some modern physics. The course is appropriate for non-science majors who are interested in science. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PHY101 pr PHY151

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.


PHY212 University Physics II

Second semester of a two-semester introduction to university physics using calculus. This course covers vibrations and waves; electricity and magnetism; optics; and a brief introduction to modern physics. The course is appropriate for math, science, and engineering students. Calculus will be used throughout the course. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in MAT250, Calculus II. (3 lecture hours/2 laboratory hours/1 recitation hour)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PHY101 or PHY151

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
Third Semester Credits
CSC230   4
CSC125 (or)
ENR110
 
Procedural Programming (or)
Engineering and Scientific Computing

CSC125 Procedural Programming

Students design programs in C using a procedural design paradigm that examines issues associated with low-level programming such as explicit memory management, efficiency, pointers, the compilation process, and debugging. C programs are run in a Unix/Linux environment.

Prerequisite: Any college-level programming course

Offered: Fall


ENR110 Engineering and Scientific Computing

This course introduces students to the elements and practices of computer programming through the MATLAB computation and visualization environment. Assuming no prior background in computer programming, this course will enable one to write programs that solve problems involving the manipulation of numbers. Procedural and object-oriented programming techniques will be taught. Students will be required to complete numerous in-class examples and homework assignments. During the semester, other technical high-level programming languages (e.g., Python) will be introduced through lecture discussion.

Prerequisite: MAT035 or MAT041 and ENL108 or ESL201 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score. Students need to have a basic knowledge of the Windows operating system and file management.

Offered: Varies

4 (or)
3
    Humanities & Fine Arts 3
    Humanities & Fine Arts 3
    Behavioral & Social Science 3
Fourth Semester Credits
CSC240  
Introduction to Computer Systems (or)
Elective (if needed)

CSC240 Introduction to Computer Systems

Students investigate how computer systems execute programs, store information, and communicate in order to become more effective programmers in terms of performance, portability, and robustness. Topics covered include: machine-level code and its generation by optimizing compilers, performance evaluation and optimization, computer arithmetic, memory organization and management, networking technology and protocols, and supporting concurrent computation. 4 class hours.

Prerequisites: CSC130

Offered: Varies

Note: CSC240 Introduction to Computer Systems is recommended for students who plan to transfer to UMass-Dartmouth or UMass-Amherst.

4 (or)
0–4
CSC250   3
MAT245 (or)
MAT220
 
Linear Algebra (or)
Discrete Mathematics & Introduction to Proofs

MAT245 Linear Algebra

A first course in the study and analysis of linear systems and their applications in mathematics, engineering, computer science, business, economics, and other fields involving large multi-variate models of real world phenomena. Topics include: matrices, determinants, vectors in 2-dimensional space and 3-dimensional space, vector spaces, independence, basis, rank, linear transformations with matrix representation, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, applications to differential equations.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in MAT240 or MAT180

Offered: Fall


MAT220 Discrete Mathematics & Introduction to Proofs

This introductory course is designed for prospective mathematics and computer science majors. It covers basic techniques of mathematical proof and reasoning, with an emphasis on discrete structures as well as concepts widely used in computing. Topics include set theory, functions, relations, proposition logic, methods of proof, mathematical induction, recursion, and Boolean algebra. Additional topics in discrete mathematics will be selected from number theory, combinatorics, graph theory, and finite state automata.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in MAT180 or MAT195 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3 (or)
4
    3
    3
Total Credits 61/67

M Designates a Milestone course. A milestone course must be completed in the semester indicated to ensure that you remain on track to continue on in your program and graduate on time.

The Associate in Arts degree does not indicate a specialized degree in a concentration. Students who complete this concentration will satisfy the requirements of MassTransfer. For additional information pertaining to degree requirements, please refer to Degree Requirements.